Tag Archives: meditation

Backlash against mindfulness

Mindfulness has been written about loads in the last few years. From some of the articles you’d think it was a magical cure all, and perhaps inevitably, it seems to me that recently the worm has turned, and people have got bored, or irritated, with mindfulness.

Only a few weeks ago I was interviewed by a CQC inspector who rolled his eyes when I said that I ran a mindfulness group on the ward where I work. He was fed up of hearing about mindfulness, which reminded my of this piece a few weeks back by Eva Wiseman, on how she’s had enough of mindfulness colouring books being sent to her. To me, the backlash is interesting for a few reasons:

buddha

  1. Reasons behind the backlash. The pattern here feels familiar to me – setting something up to be brilliant then rubbishing it, when the reality is somewhere in the middle (as the evidence base suggests).
  2. The experience. The boredom and irritability that people describe feeling about mindfulness actually reminds me a bit of what it’s like to sit and practice mindfulness sometimes. It isn’t about having a blank mind, it’s about having your mind as usual, watching your mind do its thing, which often is boring, or annoying, and not always calm and peaceful.
  3. The idea of mindfulness having grand claims. Mindfulness itself has never claimed anything – it just is. It isn’t mindfulness practice that has big promises, marketing strategies and glossy packaging. That’s what we, as people, do with it. Mindfulness is just being in the here and now, instead of getting caught up in the past or the future.
  4. Mindfulness aids. You can use a colouring book to do it but you don’t have to. There are a growing number of mindfulness resources, like these books, available, and they are not for everyone, but I don’t think there’s anything wrong with trying to use new ways to help people meditate.

One group who are brilliant at explaining mindfulness to children using clever resources (and no colouring books) are the mindfulness in schools project. They use this clip from kung fu panda to explain what mindfulness is. Check it out if you want to see what Ugway is talking about.

If you aren’t bored or irritated by the idea and you want to give it a go then you could try the ubiquitous Headspace app or Mark Williams‘ down to earth introductory book: Finding Peace in a Frantic World.

Mindfulness might not be a panacea, and it might be boring sometimes, but I’d still really recommend it.

Meditation in House of Commons

You don't have to sit on a mountain to be able to do mindful meditation

You don’t have to sit on a mountain to be able to do mindful meditation

Mindfulness meditation made it into a debate in the House of Commons this week, in the context of government explorations of ways to help people with mental health problems who are out of work.

As usual, mental health concerns are being considered because of their economic impact, but at least evidence on the benefits of meditation is being noticed.

Meditation has started making its way into schools too. The ‘Mindfulness in Schools Project’ is a non-governmental group of teachers and researchers who are investigating the benefits of a specially devised meditation programme for young people in educational settings. Results suggest meditation can improve children’s concentration and general wellbeing. Maybe the government should look at putting some funding into using meditation in schools rather than waiting for problems to develop later on.

If you want to hear what mindfulness for young people sounds like, download “beditation” from itunes, part of the mindfulness in schools “.b” podcast.